Developing The Country Together

The Regional Infrastructure Development Agency will continue to implement plans and programmes in line with the national direction. The Regional Infrastructure Development Agency (BPIW) of the Ministry of Public Works & Public Housing (PUPR) has always focused on the national policy directions and priorities recommended by the President, ministers and other national planning agencies.

BPIW head Rido Matari Ichwan explains how BPIW’s programmes and activities in 2017 have been oriented according to these national policies.

How does BPIW develop its programmes in keeping with national policy directions?
The implementation of our programmes and activities is no longer based on function, but on priorities. Programmes and budgets that are in line with national policy directions and priorities provide optimal benefits to society. BPIW integrates PUPR infrastructure planning innovation and programming with regional development and synchronises inter-infrastructure programmes.

What are the main themes and priorities for construction development in the central government’s work plan?
There are several guiding principles for regional development, such as promoting the growth of a competitive region (both nationally and globally), stimulating an increase in regional production, and increasing the production’s added value. The focus is on potential and strategic clusters to encourage economic growth and attract regional development.

PUPR infrastructure programmes are designed to sustain and boost economic growth in 2017–2018, in support of the central government’s work plan, themed Driving Investment and Strengthening Infrastructure Development to Accelerate Economic Growth Quality.

BPIW integrates PUPR infrastructure planning innovation and programming with regional development and synchronises inter-infrastructure programmes | Photo by Shutterstock/ GeorginaCaptures

How can BPIW realise these programmes?
Steps we are implementing include: enhancing spending quality, improving the business and investment climate, raising competitiveness, and increasing industry value-add. We also encourage the private sector’s role in financing and developing infrastructure.

We are also finalising the PPUR Regional Pre-Consultation (Pra Konreg) and Consultation (Konreg) implementation scheme for it to become the standard rule in PUPR’s infrastructure development programming system, and establishing a financing scheme.

BPIW encourages the private sector’s role in financing and developing infrastructure | Photo by Shutterstock/ Nublee bin Shamsu Bahar

The infrastructure and regional development programmes are being refined according to each strategic development area (WPS), beginning with a clear planning methodology, to ensure a high level of accountability for all BPIW programmes.

The Indonesian government has decided that tourism will be one of the main growth drivers in transforming the national economy. How does BPIW’s programmes fit into this thrust?
We are running incubator pilot programmes—both for urban development and regional development—as well as developing rest areas, or smart pavilions (anjungan cerdas), for road users along national roads.

Our focus is on tourism incubators, particularly at three national strategic tourism areas (KSPN): Lake Toba in North Sumatra, Borobudur in Central Java, and Mandalika in West Nusa Tenggara. All three KSPNs will be developed according to an integrated tourism master plan, financed with a loan from the World Bank.

PUPR ministry will also focus on other national priority programmes to generate optimal outcomes and benefits, such as the National Capital Integrated Coastal Development (NCICD).

Borobudur temple in Central Java | Photo by Shutterstock/ NaughtyNut

What infrastructure development activities did BPIW undertake in 2017?
Throughout the year, many activities have been carried out through our secretariat and four centres.

Activities by the PUPR Infrastructure Planning Centre (PPI) include the evaluation of integration infrastructure planning at WPS 29 (Ternate–Sofifi–Daruba) and WPS 30 (Ambon–Masohi), and PUPR Renstra Review 2015-2019.

In addition, the PPI launched a PUPR infrastructure development integration plan to handle national strategic issues. It is also focusing on increasing connectivity of border areas and outer islands. These activities will lead to programme synchronisation and short-term development financing for 2018–2020, and the integration of regional infrastructure development. We have also collected data for a short-term review of regional development integration with a clear planning methodology, to ensure a high level of accountability for all BPIW programmes.

Labuan Bajo in Flores, East Nusa Tenggara | Photo by Shutterstock/ kubais

The Indonesian government has decided that tourism will be one of the main growth drivers in transforming the national economy. How does BPIW’s programmes fit into this thrust?
We are running incubator pilot programmes—both for urban development and regional development—as well as developing rest areas, or smart pavilions (anjungan cerdas), for road users along national roads.

Our focus is on tourism incubators, particularly at three national strategic tourism areas (KSPN): PUPR infrastructure in three WPS categories, namely Growth Centre, Integrated Growth Centre and Growth Growing Centre.

The Programming and Evaluation of Infrastructure Integration Centre was involved in monitoring and evaluating the PUPR Development Programme for Region I, which covers Java and Sumatera.

The Strategic Area Development Centre drafted guidelines for the development and management of smart pavilions and implementation of integration programmes within strategic areas (outside WPS borders and outer islands). The centre also implemented an WPS integrated programme implementation action plan, including preparing a PUPR integrated master plan and development plan for both Labuan Bajo as a tourist destination and the Patimban region. On top of that, it prepared foreign loan documents for the infrastructure development in tourist areas, accelerated the development of WPS 6, which covers Merak–Bakauheni–Bandar Lampung–Palembang–Tanjung Api–Api (MBBPT), managed the smart pavilions, and developed the land monitoring system (simonah).

The Urban Development Centre prepared a ‘new urban agenda’ plan for the development of urban areas in Indonesia. It has undertaken a masterplan review, development plan and pre-design preparations for Kota Baru Tanjung Selor and its surroundings, to be followed by Lake Toba and Kota Baru Sorong, as well as national priority rural areas (KPPN) in Sumatra, Sulawesi, Sumbawa and Kalimantan.

What is the role of the BIPW secretariat?
Our secretariat updates the BIPW database with big data technology and updates the spatial data on regional infrastructure development. It also performs a software-based financial control system to support effective, efficient, transparent and accountable financial management. It supports the PUPR ministry in mapping out potential areas of cooperation, and also in developing cooperative schemes to support the integration of regional infrastructure.

Rido Matari Ichwan with his team from BPIW

What are BIPW’s plans for infrastructure sector in 2018?
BPIW will finalise some past year’s programmes that have yet to be completed to be entered into the 2018 programme. The programmes that cannot be funded will be combined. We will review the programmes—I think there are around 16,000 to be evaluated—and shortlist those with strategic development issues. About 40 per cent of allocated funds will be directed towards the thematic and efficient integration of programmes.


IR. RIDO MATARI ICHWAN, MCP
Head of Regional Infrastructure Development Agency, Ministry of Public Works & Housing

Born in Jakarta, Rido completed his studies at the Bandung Institute of Technology (ITB), majoring in Planetary Engineering, and received his master’s degree at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), majoring in city planning. In 1992, he started working at the Ministry of Public Works and Housing (PUPR). In 2014, he was appointed as expert staff in the field of economy and investment to the PUPR minister. Two years later, he was appointed as head of Regional Infrastructure Development Agency (BPIW).

 

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