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Hong Kong Antiquities Authority has declared three historic items as monuments

The Hong Kong Government announced that the Antiquities Authority has declared three historic items as monuments under the Antiquities and Monuments Ordinance on 25 October 2019. The three items consist of one artefact, the rock carving at Cape Collinson in the Eastern District; and two buildings, Yuk Hui Temple in Wan Chai and Hau Mei Fung Ancestral Hall in Sheung Shui.

Yuk Hui Temple

Yuk Hui Temple was built by local residents of Wan Chai for the worship of Pak Tai. It serves as an important historic landmark of the early development of Wan Chai and an icon of the local community’s identity.

The temple consists of the central main building and two side buildings. The main building was built in the first year of the Tongzhi reign of the Qing dynasty in 1862. The completion year of the temple was inscribed on a ridge purlin of the entrance hall, which is rarely seen in traditional Chinese buildings in Hong Kong.

Lastly, Hau Mei Fung Ancestral Hall in Kam Tsin that was built around the late 18th century to commemorate Hau Mei-fung, a student of the Imperial Academy of the Qianlong reign of the Qing dynasty in 1788. The ancestral hall is a typical Qing vernacular two-hall, three-bay building, representative of the social and economic status of the Mei-fung branch of the Hau clan. It has been mainly used as a family ancestral hall for worshipping ancestors and dealing with matters concerning the Mei-fung branch since the establishment.― Construction+ Online

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